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South Sydney Rabbitohs NRL star Jai Arrow’s dog is put down after it mauled greyhound to death

Rabbitohs star Jai Arrow has branded a local council’s decision to euthanise his dog as a ‘disgrace’ – despite the American Staffordshire Terrier killing a greyhound just three months after mauling a small dog in Sydney

The Souths enforcer was not present when his dog Thor fatally attacked an ageing 11-year-old greyhound named Ruby at Bateau Bay on the NSW Central Coast in July.

Ruby, who was owned by devastated couple John and Karen Gowans, was mauled and killed just 100m from their home – prompting Central Coast Council to announce they would put down Arrow’s dog Thor.

South Sydney star Jai Arrow has branded the decision of a NSW council to put his dog Thor down as a disgrace, despite the dog mauling and killing a greyhound

South Sydney star Jai Arrow has branded the decision of a NSW council to put his dog Thor down as a disgrace, despite the dog mauling and killing a greyhound

Eleven-year-old Ruby could not be saved after being attacked by Arrow's American Staffordshire Terrier and her owners wanted him to be 'accountable'

Eleven-year-old Ruby could not be saved after being attacked by Arrow’s American Staffordshire Terrier and her owners wanted him to be ‘accountable’

The American Staffordshire Terrier was euthanised on Friday afternoon, prompting the 27-year-old Souths forward to brand the decision a ‘disgrace’. 

‘I think it’s an absolute disgrace that they couldn’t even notify me and at least give me the decency to go and say goodbye to him,’ Arrow told Channel 9. 

Arrow’s comments come after his lawyer Paul McGirr hammered the ‘gutless’ council, before announcing they would ‘explore all legal avenues’.

Jai Arrow's American Staffordshire Terrier, Thor, before he was put down by a NSW council after mauling and killing another dog

Jai Arrow’s American Staffordshire Terrier, Thor, before he was put down by a NSW council after mauling and killing another dog

‘They (Central Coast Council) terminate the dog on Friday and then at 4.45pm on Friday send me an email saying they would exercise their powers and they would terminate the dog – yet they had already done it,’ McGirr told the Daily Telegraph.

‘We were looking to appeal the decision of the council to the Supreme Court and throughout this process we have asked them not to do anything.

‘We wrote further correspondence to (Central Coast Council) and asked to be present, along with Mr Arrow, to explain the position of Jai not being present near the dog in any of the alleged attacks,’ said McGirr.

Jai Arrow (right) remonstrates with Cronulla star Nicho Hynes in the Rabbitohs' one-point loss on July 30

Jai Arrow (right) remonstrates with Cronulla star Nicho Hynes in the Rabbitohs’ one-point loss on July 30 

Arrow has played 124 NRL matches for Brisbane, Gold Coast and South Sydney since debuting in 2016 for the Broncos

Arrow has played 124 NRL matches for Brisbane, Gold Coast and South Sydney since debuting in 2016 for the Broncos

Whether or not Arrow was present at the attack (he was away at State of Origin duties) does not change the fact an old dog was killed – and outraged people took the social media to condemn the NRL star for playing the victim. 

One dog lover said: ‘Arrow never should’ve allowed this dog to be under anyone else’s control after the first time it attacked a dog’ when commenting about the fact Arrow and his lawyer asked for leniency given he wasn’t present. 

One wrote Arrow ‘should never be allowed to own a dog again’, while another said it was an ‘obvious decision’ by the council, who simply had no choice given the circumstances.

When the attack occurred in late July, Thor, who was being looked after by Arrow’s sister, bolted out of a yard before attacking Ruby, the greyhound.

She could not be saved after suffering a punctured thorax, dislocated jaw and multiple deep cuts in the vicious attack.

John Gowans demanded Arrow be held ‘accountable’ – questioning how much the NRL star thought the life of his dead dog was worth.

American Staffordshire Terrier Thor has been put down after killing an 11-year-old greyhound, which owners says 'was onto her like a flash'

American Staffordshire Terrier Thor has been put down after killing an 11-year-old greyhound, which owners says ‘was onto her like a flash’

‘All of a sudden this other dog was just onto her like a flash, I didn’t see it coming, I couldn’t protect her, I couldn’t do anything,’ Gowans, sporting an arm cast, told Channel Nine in an interview after the attack.

‘There was just nothing that could be done for her, if she wasn’t able to be a normal happy dog, I didn’t want her suffering.  

I just want him to be made accountable for this. I mean he had to pay $10,000 in vet bills down in Sydney, what is a dead dog worth?’

Arrow’s dog had already been labelled ‘dangerous’ by Waverly Council after he mauled another dog owned by Sydney woman Kate Muir in April at Bronte Beach.

The attack left Muir’s miniature schnauzer, Millie, badly injured and in need of urgent medical treatment, which cost $10,000.

Kate Muir's miniature schnauzer Millie was left badly hurt (pictured) by the attack. Jai Arrow has offered to pay all vet bills, which Muir said ran to $10,000

Kate Muir’s miniature schnauzer Millie was left badly hurt (pictured) by the attack. Jai Arrow has offered to pay all vet bills, which Muir said ran to $10,000

Muir alleged she was also injured as she tried to prevent her dog being mauled. 

‘We deeply apologise to the family and the dog for this incident,’ Arrow said at the time.

The NSW Office of Local Government (OLG) states dogs declared dangerous must wear a muzzle and be leashed at all times, amongst a host of other requirements.

If owners fail to comply with the requirements, they may be issued with a penalty notice and/or liable for imprisonment and the dog may, under certain circumstances, be seized and destroyed. 

American Staffordshire Terriers like Thor were involved in more than twice as many attacks as any other breed in the last quarter

American Staffordshire Terriers like Thor were involved in more than twice as many attacks as any other breed in the last quarter

According to the OLG, American Staffordshire Terriers like Arrow’s dog were involved in twice as many attacks at the next closest breed.

From April 1 – June 30 212 American Staffordshire Terriers were involved in attacking either humans or other animals. The next closest was Bull Terriers (Staffordshire) with 103 reported attacks. 

Arrow also owns a Rottweiler, which were responsible for the sixth most attacks during the last quarter, named Koda. 

Jai Arrow owns a Rottweiler named Koda (right) as well as his since-euthanised American Staffordshire Terrier Tho

Jai Arrow owns a Rottweiler named Koda (right) as well as his since-euthanised American Staffordshire Terrier Tho

A Central Coast Council spokesperson confirmed Arrow’s dog had been put down, and said the NRL star and his lawyer are free to pursue legal avenues. 

‘Council acknowledges that it is extremely distressing for all involved when a pet has to be euthanised. Council has a duty to administer the NSW Companion Animals Act 1998 and to protect our community from dangerous dogs,’ the spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia.

Council can confirm that Mr Arrow’s dog Thor was euthanised on Friday, August 19. Mr Arrow and his solicitor were provided with multiple opportunities to make representations to Council, which were considered by Council prior to a final determination being made. 

‘Mr Arrow and his solicitor were free to pursue any legal option available to them in relation to this matter,’ the spokesperson said.

Requirements for owners of declared dangerous dogs 

If you own a dog that has been declared dangerous, you must ensure that: 

  • your dog is microchipped and lifetime registered
  • your dog is desexed (or permanently sterilised)
  • you have a valid annual permit for the dog
  • your dog is not, at any time, left in the sole charge of a person under the age of 18 years
  • your dog is contained in an enclosure that meets the requirements of clause 24 of the Companion Animals Regulation 2018 when on the premises where it is ordinarily kept. You must also obtain a certificate of compliance from your local council, certifying that the enclosure meets the regulatory requirements
  • you prominently display dangerous dog warning signs on the premises where your dog is ordinarily kept
  • your dog wears a prescribed collar at all times
  • your dog wears a muzzle and is securely leashed at all times when outside the enclosure where it is ordinarily kept. If your dog has been declared as a dangerous dog because it is being kept or used for hunting, it is exempt from the requirements to be muzzled and securely leashed when outside the enclosure where ordinarily kept when it is actually hunting
  • you notify the local council for the area in which you intend to keep your dog, if this council area is different to the council area where your dog was kept when it was declared dangerous.
  • you notify the local council for the area in which your dog is ordinarily kept:
  • if the location (within the same council area) at which your dog is ordinarily kept changes as soon as practicable after the change of location
  • if your dog, with or without provocation, attacks or injures a person or animal, other than vermin (must notify within 24 hours of the attack or injury). It is an offence, under the Companion Animals Act 1998, to encourage a declared dangerous dog to attack a person or animal
  • if your dog cannot be found (must notify within 24 hours of your dog’s absence first being noticed)
  • if your dog dies (must notify as soon as practicable after your dog’s death).
  • you do not transfer ownership of your dog. It is also an offence to accept ownership of a dangerous dog
  • you do not sell (sell includes give away) your dog or advertise it for sale




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